April 7, 2009

Who Will Guard Your Nest Egg?

There's a power struggle in Washington that will shape how investors get the advice they need.

On one side are stockbrokers and other securities salespeople who work for Wall Street firms, banks and insurance companies. On the other are financial planners or investment advisers who often work for themselves or smaller firms.

Brokers are largely regulated by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, which is funded by the brokerage business itself and inspects firms every one or two years. Under Finra's rules, brokers must recommend only investments that are "suitable" for clients.

Advisers are regulated by the states or the Securities and Exchange Commission, which examines firms every six to 10 years on average. Advisers act out of "fiduciary duty," or the obligation to put their clients' interests first.

Most investors don't understand this key distinction. A report by Rand Corp. last year found that 63% of investors think brokers are legally required to act in the best interest of the client; 70% believe that brokers must disclose any conflicts of interest. Advisers always have those duties, but brokers often don't.

Now the battle is over whether Finra should adopt a fiduciary standard that puts the clients' interests first.

YES. YES. YES.

Posted by Jill Fallon at April 7, 2009 10:38 AM | Permalink