February 23, 2011

Radical suits race to the bottom

Chris Cantrell on Radical Suits and Their Suckers

A better name for "community organizer" is "radical suit," because community organizers are really the lefty version of the corporate suits that fly in to the plant in their executive jets, issue just enough ridiculous orders to prove that they haven't a clue, and then head back to the FBO and the next gig.
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Not to get too Marxist about this, but we are talking about the inevitability of a law of history.  The productive forces are changing, and the social superstructure is going to have to change too.  The liberal and the radical suits can help their Big Unit followers through the change or they can drive them into the ditch.  It's their choice.

Via Instapundit, natch.

What a great and fitting term is "radical suit".    And, yes,  I do think we are undergoing a radical restructuring of our social infrastructure  as Walter Russell Mead so persuasively argues in Race to the Bottom?

Is America in a race to the bottom, or are we going through what the Austrian born economist Joseph Schumpeter would call a process of “creative destruction”?
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For many Americans, the changes in our society — stagnant or falling real wages for non-supervisory employees, cutbacks in public services, rising costs of medical care, an affordability crisis in higher education and on and on — look like the consequences of what is often called “the race to the bottom.” 
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Blue collar workers have been getting the shaft since 1973; white collar workers are starting to get the same treatment now.  Two of the same forces that drove down blue collar wages are starting to hit professionals: competition from overseas and the use of technology to raise productivity so that fewer workers are needed to do the same amount of work.
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Tens of millions of Americans aren’t just reading about American decline; they are living American decline.  Access to middle class jobs is getting harder — and the jobs still around are less stable.  Public services are slowly declining; cash strapped states and towns can’t provide the kind of education that could open more doors.  Roads and bridges aren’t being maintained.  Retirements are less secure.  Health care is more problematic than ever as insurance prices rise — and fewer jobs offer decent plans.  College tuition has exploded; we have a generation of college students carrying mortgage-sized student loans even as they scramble for elusive jobs in a snakebit economy.
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And there’s more.  The wealthiest in our society have gradually been pulling away from the rest of us — not just because so many of them are getting so rich, but because more of them are focused on the global economy and the health of the global system than on the prosperity of the United States of America. 
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I wrote in my first post on Madison that
I don’t think that restructuring state government is about the race to the bottom: it’s the way to avoid a race to the bottom. 
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The key to success is obvious: we need to continue to raise productivity throughout the economy.  If productivity goes up quickly enough, wages can rise here even if they are falling elsewhere.  This is getting harder; productivity is both easier to measure and to raise in manufacturing than in services.
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In particular we are going to have to look at health, government, education and the legal industry.
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What we’ve got to do here is to deploy technology and aggressive, creative reform and restructuring to health, education and government. 
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Staffs are going to have to shrink in ways that are simply unimaginable to present day government workers and their union leaders. Outsourcing government functions to private business will be a growth industry; in some cases the work will be outsourced overseas but in many others, the necessary expenses of all levels of government can and should be used to promote the growth of entrepreneurial small business rather than the maintenance of large bureaucracies.
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The educational system is also going to change in ways the unions and the guilds can’t imagine — and will fight to the death.  Going forward, students need to be evaluated and credentialed on the basis of what they know, not on the basis of time served. 
Posted by Jill Fallon at February 23, 2011 9:05 PM | Permalink