December 8, 2012

Facing Retirement

Here's one way to get you saving for your retirement .  Know What You'll Look Like in 30 Years

Chances are good, however, that you’re not saving enough for your retirement. To convince you to sock away enough gold for your golden years, Merrill Edge has launched an online magic mirror to remind you that you won’t be forever young.

Face Retirement lives up to the catty double meaning in its name. Using a facial aging algorithm, the web app snaps a photo of you with your laptop’s camera and then shows you what you’ll look like at 47, 57, 67 and so on, all the way to 107.
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In a 2011 study cited by Merrill Edge (Merrill Lynch’s online discount brokerage), Stanford behavioral economics researchers say that we’re often reluctant to save for retirement because deep down we don’t identify with that older person we’ll one day be: “To people estranged from their future selves, saving is like a choice between spending money today or giving it to a stranger years from now.”

Via Instapundit
Posted by Jill Fallon at 3:19 PM | Permalink

The Real-life Dr. House

For Second Opinion, Consult a Computer?

Professionals in every field revere their superstars, and in medicine the best diagnosticians are held in particularly high esteem. Dr. Gurpreet Dhaliwal, 39, a self-effacing associate professor of clinical medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, is considered one of the most skillful clinical diagnosticians in practice today.


 Real Life Dr. House

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To observe him at work is like watching Steven Spielberg tackle a script or Rory McIlroy a golf course. He was given new information bit by bit — lab, imaging and biopsy results. Over the course of the session, he drew on an encyclopedic familiarity with thousands of syndromes. He deftly dismissed red herrings while picking up on clues that others might ignore, gradually homing in on the accurate diagnosis.

Just how special is Dr. Dhaliwal’s talent? More to the point, what can he do that a computer cannot? Will a computer ever successfully stand in for a skill that is based not simply on a vast fund of knowledge but also on more intangible factors like intuition?
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When working on a difficult case in front of an audience, Dr. Dhaliwal puts his entire thought process on display, with the goal of “elevating the stature of thinking,” he said. He believes this is becoming more important because physicians are being assessed on whether they gave the right medicine to a patient, or remembered to order a certain test.

Without such emphasis, physicians and training programs might forget the importance of having smart, thoughtful doctors. “Because in medicine,” Dr. Dhaliwal said, “thinking is our most important procedure.”
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An expert clinical diagnostician like Dr. Dhaliwal might make a decision without being able to explain exactly what is going on in the back of his mind, as his subconscious continuously sifts the wheat from the chaff.
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Isabel, the diagnostic program that Dr. Dhaliwal sometimes uses, was created by Jason Maude, a former money manager in London, who named it for his daughter. At age 3, Isabel came down with chickenpox and doctors failed to spot a far more dangerous complication — necrotizing fasciitis, a flesh-eating infection. By the time the disease was identified, Isabel had lost so much flesh that at age 17 she is still having plastic surgery.
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He added that Isabel was aimed not so much at the Dr. Dhaliwals of the world, but at more typical physicians.

Dr. David J. Brailer, chief executive of Health Evolution Partners, which invests in health care companies, agreed. “If everyone was a diagnostic genius, we wouldn’t need these decision support tools,” he said.
Posted by Jill Fallon at 2:56 PM | Permalink

Insult to Injury

New York City Hits Sandy Victims With ‘Failure To Maintain’ Property Citation

And What's More, The Tree Causing All The Fuss Was City's Responsibility

The Department of Buildings said the citation is a mere formality. It’s a way to keep track of all downed trees.

But for people in this neighborhood…it’s a permanent mark on their property that they want removed from the records.

“They’re not only upset, but they’re insulted. And they’re nervous! They don’t know what’s going to happen as a result of having this violation,” said Elaine Young of the local neighborhood association.

Jersey shore home vanishes

"The township didn't know what happened. I called the governor's office and asked the assistant what happened. She said to me, 'Are you sure your house is gone? 'I said 'Miss, you misplace your pen or pencil. You don't misplace your house.'"

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He said he was never told that his home would be demolished and all his possessions thrown away.

"I just want to know where my house went, why was it removed, and why wasn't I afforded the opportunity to get my personal belongings," he said.

The culprit?  The Department of Transportation

In a statement, the department said: "The structure in question… was pushed off its foundation and jammed against another house that had come to rest in the middle of the street. The two houses had sandwiched a utility pole. Our crews did not take down any structure unless it was deemed to be unsafe…"

FEMA teams told to 'sightsee' as Sandy victims suffered

A FEMA worker who spoke to FoxNews.com described a chaotic scene at New Jersey's Fort Dix, where emergency workers arrived as the storm bore down on the Atlantic Coast. The worker said officials at the staging area were unprepared and told the incoming responders there was nothing for them to do for nearly four days.

“They told us to hurry, hurry, hurry," the worker, who works at the agency's headquarters in Washington and volunteered to deploy for the storm recovery effort. "We rushed to Fort Dix, only to find out that our liaison didn’t even know we were coming.”

“The regional coordinator even said to us, ‘I don’t know why you were rushed here because we don’t need you,'” said the worker, who spoke out of frustration with the lack of planning and coordination following the devastating storm.
Posted by Jill Fallon at 2:52 PM | Permalink

"No tag shall in time of peace be placed on mattresses quartered in any house without the consent of the owner"

Some constitutional amendments I could get behind.  Don Surber writes Fight for the right to be left alone

• Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of a health care insurance system, or prohibiting riding a motorcycle without a helmet; or abridging the freedom of hate speech, or of the politically incorrect press; or the right of the people to party, and to petition the government to leave them the heck alone.

• A well-lit household being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear incandescent light bulbs shall not be infringed.

• No tag shall in time of peace be placed on mattresses quartered in any house without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

• The right of the people to be secure in their bathrooms, bedrooms and thoughts, against unreasonable rules and regulations, shall not be violated.

• No person shall be held to answer for a picayune rule or otherwise petty regulation, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger.
Posted by Jill Fallon at 2:18 PM | Permalink