February 8, 2014

Women more at risk for stroke then men. UPDATED

Guidelines urge women to monitor stroke risks more closely than men

Women of all ages should pay more attention to the risk of stroke than the average man, watching their blood pressure carefully before they think about taking birth-control pills or getting pregnant, according to a new set of prevention guidelines released Thursday.

Women are also more likely to have risk factors associated with stroke, such as migraines, depression, diabetes and the abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation.

The guidelines from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association were the first such recommendations aimed at preventing strokes in women. Stroke is the fourth-leading cause of death for all Americans and a leading cause of disability. It’s the third-leading cause of death for women, after heart disease and cancer.

Strokes leave women worse off than men and the difference is worst in old age

Women are more likely to report pain and mobility issues three months after having a stroke than men of the same age
They are also more likely to report anxiety or depression
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The greatest gender difference is seen in those over 75.
One year after having a stroke women are still more likely to have a lower quality of life than men.
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The study showed that marital status was the most important factor separating the quality of life in men and women with those who are single faring less well.
Posted by Jill Fallon at February 8, 2014 12:03 PM | Permalink