February 24, 2014

Stem cells instead of root canals and Clean teeth to hold off arthritis

On the horizon, stem cells to repair teeth.  A novel "regenerative" technique to repair infected teeth -- claimed to be painless and cheaper than the traditional root canal treatment -- has been developed by doctors at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) in New Delhi.

Termed as "SealBio", the technique uses body's own stem cells and eliminates the need for cumbersome root canal fillings.

Instead of filling the root canal with artificial materials that may pose bio-compatibility problems, it makes use of regenerative potential of stem cells and growth factors available at the root of the teeth. Stem cells act as a repair system for the body capable of replenishing adult tissues.
In case of this technique, the stem cells at the root of the decayed teeth are stimulated to induce regeneration and deposition of a natural tissue barrier (seal) to fill up the root canal in just one sitting.

In other words, a "biological seal" is achieved at the root canal rather than attempting to seal it with artificial filling materials with all its drawbacks, the doctors say.  The root canal is restored to health by gradual build up of tissue by stem cells over a period, extending from a few weeks to some months.

Another reason to floss.  Clean teeth can hold off arthritis: Scientists discover link between gum disease bacteria and early onset of the condition

Researchers found a link between the bacterium responsible for gum disease and earlier onset of rheumatoid arthritis, as well as faster progression and greater severity of the condition.

The bacterium produces an enzyme which reacts with the residue of certain proteins.  The body recognizes these proteins as intruders, leading to an immune attack, the researchers from the University of Louisville’s School of Dentistry in Kentucky said.
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Studies indicate that compared to the general population, people with periodontal disease have an increased prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease is at least two times more prevalent in rheumatoid arthritis patients.  Other research has shown that a P. gingivatis infection in the mouth will precede rheumatoid arthritis and the bacterium is the likely culprit for onset and continuation of the autoimmune inflammatory responses that occur in the disease.
Posted by Jill Fallon at February 24, 2014 1:14 PM | Permalink