May 1, 2014

Natural Remedies for skin wounds, insect bites, sunburn, hangover, sore eyes and travel sickness

Honey for Minor Wounds

For centuries honey has been used to treat skin wounds and burns and is now used in hospitals around the globe to deal with skin infections.

Honey helps kill the bacteria that may cause infection. When honey comes into contact with damaged skin, it triggers the production of antibacterial hydrogen peroxide.Furthermore, the sugars in honey mean there is little space for water molecules (bacteria need water to survive, so reducing the amount available makes it hard for them to thrive). Dabbing on honey or a sprinkling of sugar can deprive the bacteria of water, which ultimately destroys them.

Teabags for Insect Bites

Steep a few teabags in boiling water for ten minutes, allow to cool and then apply the liquid to the sting site using a cloth. This helps to relieve inflammation as tannins in the tea are astringent, so reduce the swelling.

Cucumber for Sunburn

Cucumber, a well-known soothing remedy for tired and sore eyes, can also help bring relief to sore, sunburned skin. This is because it contains vitamin C and caffeic acid (an antioxidant also found in coffee) which both have anti-inflammatory effects that help reduce the irritation of sunburn.

Bananas for Hangover

Drinking won’t just dehydrate you (because alcohol is a diuretic), many people also feel light-headed and woozy the morning after.  This is because normally the liver releases glucose into the bloodstream. But when the liver is busy processing alcohol, this doesn’t happen, which can lead to low blood sugar levels.
While drinking plenty of water can rehydrate you, a banana helps raise depleted sugar levels — the reason being that it has a low glycaemic index. This means the sugar it contains is released slowly.


Camomile Tea for Sore Eyes

Camomile contains anti-irritant compounds such as terpenoids, and flavonoids, a form of antioxidant that soothes inflammation. Brew a cup of camomile tea. Remove the teabag and allow it to cool then place against closed eyes.

Ginger for Travel Sickness

It’s believed that compounds called gingerols and shogaols — which give ginger its spiciness — are what provide the benefits, possibly by blocking chemical messages in the brain, so helping to relax muscles in the stomach and gut.How you take it is up to you, but popular ways include ginger tea, ginger biscuits and dried ginger
Posted by Jill Fallon at May 1, 2014 12:38 PM | Permalink