June 7, 2014

Catching up on the ongoing disaster of Obamacare

More than two million people who signed up for ObamaCare are in limbo due to data discrepancies

In nearly one million of these cases, the discrepancy is related to immigration or citizenship status.
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“[T]he inconsistencies point to the possibility that many enrollees obtained coverage or subsidies without being eligible,”
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Nearly three million people are still waiting to have their applications processed.

But that's not all.  There is a separate mountain of unprocessed paperwork at Medicaid

At least 2.9 million Americans who signed up for Medicaid coverage as part of the health care overhaul have not had their applications processed, with some paperwork sitting in queues since last fall, according to a 50-state survey by CQ Roll Call.

Those delays — due to technological snags with enrollment websites, bureaucratic tangles at state Medicaid programs and a surge of applicants — betray Barack Obama’s promise to expand access to health care for some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens.

Walter Russell Mead CBO: We Can’t Score Obamacare Anymore

A translation for non-bureaucrats: We’re flying blind here.

The ACA is more than just an insurance expansion program; it also contains provisions that affect hospitals, the tax code, and other federal programs. In this footnote, the CBO is now saying that it cannot figure out how those other parts of the law affect the budget—and thus that we don’t know how the law as a whole does either.

Even more importantly, some of the CBO’s uncertainty is caused by Obama Administration decisions to change, delay, or abandon parts of the law during implementation. First came the news that census questions were altered, making it far more difficult for us to determine whether the ACA has reduced the numbers of the uninsured, and now there’s this. As time goes on, we’re becoming less and less capable of answering basic questions about whether the ACA is working.

The Economist on Health Care Fraud -That's Where the Money Is

In America the scale of medical embezzlement is extraordinary. According to Donald Berwick, the ex-boss of Medicare and Medicaid (the public health schemes for the old and poor), America lost between $82 billion and $272 billion in 2011 to medical fraud and abuse (see article). The higher figure is 10% of medical spending and a whopping 1.7% of GDP—as if robbers had made off with the entire output of Tennessee or nearly twice the budget of Britain’s National Health Service (NHS).

Crooks love American health care for two reasons. First, as Willie Sutton said of banks, it’s where the money is—no other country spends nearly as much on pills and procedures. Second, unlike a bank, it is barely guarded.
Posted by Jill Fallon at June 7, 2014 8:47 PM | Permalink