July 17, 2014

Self control is personal power and so is grit

Knowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power. — Lao-tzu -

What you have to do and the way you have to do it is incredibly simple. Whether you are willing to do it, that’s another matter. — Peter F. Drucker -

An Indulgent Life Isn’t Necessarily a Happy Life

Recent research, which will be published in next month's Journal of Personality shows that People with higher self-control also tend to lead happier lives.
--
In all three studies, the researchers found a link between self-control and happiness. The findings may be correlational and self-reported (which can always mean people may exaggerate the good stuff and minimize the bad), but the results still feel very true to life. “For me, I’ve actually found it to be quite an eye-opener,” Vohs said. “Because the lesson that should be taken away from this paper is that the best way for people to live healthy and happy lives is to avoid temptations in the first place.” Happiness is about more than living in the moment; it's important to keep the future in mind, too.

Only people who discipline themselves -  be it saving money, losing weight, learning tennis or writing a book - can reach their goals

Stuart Schneiderman comments

It turns out that if you make plans for the future and keep yourself focused on whatever it is you need to do to bring them to fruition, you cannot at the same time yield to every temptation.

It’s like being in training for a race or a competition or a recital. You need to follow a strict regimen to be capable of performing at your best. And you need to follow it consistently and regularly—you need to make it a habit.  You do not practice self-control for its own sake. You do it with a goal and a purpose in mind.

Daniel Goldman says Grit and emotional intelligence, not IQ or academic performance is the best predictor of personal and business success.

Studies at the University of Pennsylvania have found that students who don't have the highest IQs in their class but get high grades share an attitude called grit.” They keep plugging away despite any setbacks or failures.

And a 30-year longitudinal study of more than a thousand kids – the gold standard for uncovering relationships between behavioral variables – found that those children with the best cognitive control had the greatest financial success in their 30s
--
Cognitive control refers to the abilities to delay gratification in pursuit of your goals, maintaining impulse control, managing upsetting emotions well, holding focus, and possessing a readiness to learn. Grit requires good cognitive control. No wonder this results in financial and personal success….

Both grit and cognitive control exemplify self-management, a key part of emotional intelligence. IQ and technical skills matter, of course: they are crucial threshold abilities, what you need to get the job done….

It’s the distinguishing competencies that are the crucial factor in workplace success: the variables that you find only in the star performers – and those are largely due to emotional intelligence.

These human skills include, for instance, confidence, striving for goals despite setbacks, staying cool under pressure, harmony and collaboration, persuasion and influence.
Posted by Jill Fallon at July 17, 2014 11:44 PM | Permalink