December 30, 2016

Health Roundup: Alzheimer's, man flu, autism+Vitamin D

Statins link to reduced chance of Alzheimer's - major new study

A review of 400,000 patients established that those who took the tablets regularly slashed their chances of succumbing to the condition by between 12 and 15 per cent. Scientists behind the study say the link may be explained by an interplay between cholesterol, which is regulated by the drug, and beta-amyloid, which plays a role in dementia, or that an anti-inflammatory property of statins themselves could be protecting against the disease.

Man flu DOES exist! Viruses want to kill men more than women, study finds

Viruses such as HPV and TB are more likely to kill men than women, study shows. Researchers at Royal Holloway University found the pathogens had adapted to target men and cause less-severe disease in women. They believe it is because women are 'more valuable hosts' to pathogens. Women are more likely to pass the virus on to others such as babies by nursing

Could autism be linked to a lack of vitamin D?

Research reveals women who are deficient in it during pregnancy are more likely to have children who display 'autistic traits'
Lead researcher Professor John McGrath, from the University of Queensland, said this suggested vitamin D supplements could reduce the incidence of autism.  The study, led by researchers from the Queensland Brain Institute, looked at blood samples from more than 4,000 pregnant women and their children.

Women who had low vitamin D levels at 20 weeks' pregnant were more likely to have children displaying autistic traits by the age of six, the study found.  Professor McGrath said: 'This study provides further evidence that low vitamin D is associated with neuro-developmental disorders. 'Just as taking folate in pregnancy has reduced the incidence of spina bifida, the result of this study suggests that prenatal vitamin D supplements may reduce the incidence of autism.'

Homeopathy effective for 0 out of 68 illnesses, study finds

Treatment has 'no discernible convincing effects beyond placebo'

Though placebos can have an astonishing effect.

Posted by Jill Fallon at December 30, 2016 1:15 PM | Permalink