December 30, 2016

Health roundup: heartburn, 'sugar-free' and Parkinson's

Popular heartburn medications linked to higher risk of stroke

Millions of Americans take proton pump inhibitors to treat acid reflux and heartburn. Known as PPIs, they are among the most prescribed drugs in the United States and are widely available over the counter. The research was conducted in Denmark among a quarter-million patients who suffered from stomach pain and indigestion, and were taking one of four PPIs: Prilosec, Protonix, Prevacid or Nexium.  Overall stroke risk increased 21% among patients who were taking a PPI, according to the study. At the lowest doses, the authors found either no or minimal increased risk of stroke. At the highest doses, they found that stroke risk increased 33% for Prilosec and Prevacid patients, 50% for Nexium patients and 79% for Protonix patients.

Parkinson's could start in the GUT not the brain:

Scientists at California Institute of Technology find first ever link between the disease and gut microbes.  Studying mice, they managed to treat their symptoms with antibiotics.  The discovery, published today in the journal Cell, could overhaul medical research and treatment of Parkinson's.

Sugar-free products stop us getting slimmer

Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital said,"We found that aspartame blocks a gut enzyme called intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP)," and its beneficial aspects.  IAP is produced in the small intestine. "We previously showed [this enzyme] can prevent obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

DNA linked to sugar cravings also leads to binge drinking, study finds. Is THIS the booze gene?

Beta-Klotho is activated in the brain by a hormone produced in the liver.  Around 60% of the population carry a variation, researchers found. Having the variant made adults drink an extra 0.97g of alcohol each day.
Posted by Jill Fallon at December 30, 2016 1:16 PM | Permalink