February 2, 2017

Health roundup: Eczema, chilies, back pain and "breathprints"

Petroleum Jelly May Reduce Risk of Eczema

Applying inexpensive petroleum jelly to a new baby daily for the first six months of life may reduce the risk that the infant will develop eczema, which can be a lifelong torment, according to a new analysis....The theory is that moisturizers “seal” a baby’s skin against some invader that triggers inflammation.

Chillies could help beat cancer as research finds capsaicin destroys diseased cells

Capsaicin, the active component that gives chillies their trademark kick, can switch on specialized channels surrounding cancer cells causing them to die....However, capsaicin isn't effective if it's eaten, inhaled or injected, and researchers think it will only be effective as a pill attached to another drug that targets cancer cells.

Back pain? Only exercise will give you long-lasting relief..Ibuprofen DOESN'T work for back pain: Only 1 in 6 feel any benefit from taking the drug (and exercise is the only effective treatment)

Scientists from the George Institute for Global Health in Australia examined 35 trials involved more than 6,000 patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the study published in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. They found its benefits were minimal and were as ineffective as paracetamol (Tylenol). In fact, the cheap pills made adults 3 times more likely to have stomach ulcers
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Yoga can help relieve the agony of back pain, a major review of medical evidence last month found.The practice, which includes stretching and breathing exercises, is an effective way to improve mobility and ease the chronic discomfort, experts said.  Researchers at the University of Maryland found yoga was twice as likely to improve the condition than simply doing back exercises.

Researchers Can Now Diagnose Parkinson’s, Cancer Via Patient’s ‘Breathprints’    The breath test could be the next blood test.

A promising new technique allows scientists to identify the presence of 17 different diseases based on the smell of somebody’s breath. While groundbreaking, the concept of studying the chemical makeup of human byproducts like sweat, urine, tears, and breath has been around since Hippocrates hypothesized about it in 400 B.C

Exhaled breathe contains oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a small amount of over 100 different chemical compounds that, when analyzed in relation to one another, can reveal a lot about the state of someone’s health.

In the hopes of advancing this prospect, scientists have created “breathprints,” distinct patterns found in one’s breath, for illnesses. “Just as each of us has a unique fingerprint that distinguishes us from others, each disease has a chemical signature that distinguishes it from other diseases and from a normal state of health,” Professor Hossam Haick of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, who led the research group, said. “

The “breathprints” were created based on samples collected from 1,404 subjects diagnosed with one of 17 different diseases. Using artificial intelligence to analyze the results, scientists learned that each disease had a unique chemical marker based on the various amounts of 13 chemical compounds.
Posted by Jill Fallon at February 2, 2017 11:19 PM | Permalink