March 18, 2017

How to Raise Successful Boys

Want to Raise Successful Boys? Science Says Do This (but Their Schools Probably Won't)

Students--and especially boys--need hours of physical activity every day. They don't get enough because their schools won't let them.

We inhibit children's academic growth (especially among boys), because the lack of physical activity makes it harder for them to concentrate...."In order for children to learn, they need to be able to pay attention. In order for them to pay attention, we need to let them move."

Most boys are rambunctious. Often they seem like they're in a constant state of motion: running, jumping, fighting, playing, getting hurt--maybe getting upset--and getting right back into the physical action.Except at school, where they're required to sit still for long periods of time. (And when they fail to stay still, how are they punished? Often by being forced to skip recess--and thus they sit still longer.)
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Restricting kids' movement like this leads them to increased anger and frustration, less ability to regulate emotions, and higher aggressiveness during the limited times they are allowed to play, Hanscom writes. "Elementary children need at least three hours of active free play a day to maintain good health and wellness. Currently, they are only getting a fraction."
Posted by Jill Fallon at 5:46 PM | Permalink

On beautiful women

On beautiful women by David Warren.

"There are two kinds of women to whom I am attracted: bad ones and good ones"

....Over time — and I suppose age helps, though not as much as the young might suppose — I find that I have been developing "a preferential option for good women."...I am writing as a male, incidentally.  Women will have to speak for themselves.  Their attractions to men are beyond my comprehension.
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When it comes to bad women, I find that my attention is focused, almost but not quite involuntarily, on those who just happen to be young and gorgeous.  Whereas, when it comes to good women, my attention is captured by all ages.  And whereas, in the first case, the idea of possession is never far away, in the second it disperses.....And often enough, unconventionally beautiful, as for instance certain old ladies, married or widowed or never married or nuns, who exquisitely embody the feminine principle.  To be in their company is to be somehow washed, of that which makes one most grossly male.
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Women have been not "objectified" in our culture so much as monetized; used as a sales tool.  Every man who walks through our contemporary world is exposed to this gnawing devilry.  Women are demeaned by the "soft" pornography that surrounds us; on the billboards, but also walking the streets.  Actually it is quite hard pornography, by any traditional measure; one might even say it is exhausting.  It enters not only the eyes of men, portals to the soul; but also the eyes and souls of the women.  By increments they become what they behold.

There are women who are beautiful, as paintings.  I could gaze on them all day.  But in the moment lust enters the configuration, that beauty is destroyed.  As anything else in the economy it becomes something to use then discard.   
Posted by Jill Fallon at 4:52 PM | Permalink

Aging in Japan

Robots for the Elderly in Japan

 Telenoid

One of the Atlantic's photos of the week is this face of the remote-controlled humanoid Telenoid at a nursing home in Natori, Japan on March 13, 2017.

This is the first case of a Telenoid being installed at a nursing home in the world. The 2.7 kg humanoid enables the operator to communicate with the elderly over long distance, with its camera and microphone capturing the voice and movements of an operator and projecting them through its body to the elderly. The nursing home staff have seen elderly patients, especially those with dementia, becoming more active and positive to communicate when they communicate with the Telenoids. Telenoids cost 1,000,000 JPY (approximately $8,700) and can be rented for 50,000 JPY (about $435) per month.

Just as a Geriatric Crime Wave is sweeping across Japan
Japan's prison system is being driven to budgetary crisis by demographics, a welfare shortfall and a new, pernicious breed of villain: the recidivist retiree. And the silver-haired crooks, say academics, are desperate to be behind bars.

Crime figures show that about 35 per cent of shoplifting offenses are committed by people over 60. Within that age bracket, 40 per cent of repeat offenders have committed the same crime more than six times.  There is good reason, concludes a report, to suspect that the shoplifting crime wave in particular represents an attempt by those convicted to end up in prison — an institution that offers free food, accommodation and healthcare.
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Between 1991 and 2013, the latest year for which the Ministry of Justice publishes figures, the number of elderly inmates in jail for repeating the same offense six times has climbed 460 per cent.

Posted by Jill Fallon at 4:20 PM | Permalink