December 7, 2012

The Queen's Corgi graveyard

Tiny headstones of Royal pets that spent years as ''loyal companions' pictured in quiet corner of Sandringham

The Queen is known to be inseparable from her beloved Corgis.  Now poignant pictures have emerged of the graves of royal pets from throughout the generations.  The little-known plot is hidden away in a quiet corner of the 20,000-acre Sandringham estate in Norfolk.

It was created by Queen Victoria after the death of her Collie, Noble, in 1887, and revived in 1959 when Elizabeth II wanted somewhere to bury her first Corgi, Susan.

 Pet+Cemetery@Sandringham


 Corgi Tombstones Sandy Sugar
Posted by Jill Fallon at 1:33 PM | Permalink

No fuss funeral with pizza and football game

Funeral mixed with football game viewing

A Minnesota woman said the funeral for her late boyfriend will involve pizza and watching the Minnesota Vikings take on the Green Bay Packers.

Terri Moffitt of Hugo said Don Brommerich, who died of brain cancer Nov. 11 at the age of 53, was "a no-fuss kind of guy" as well as a diehard Vikings fan, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported Thursday.

"I didn't want a priest or minister that Don didn't know up there blabbing for an hour about a guy he never knew," Moffitt said. "We were looking at the football stuff and I said, 'Oh, there's a Packer-Viking game on Sunday. That's it.'"

Tim Tarmann of Roberts Family Funeral Home in Forest Lake helped Moffitt plan the celebration of Brommerich's life.

"We are seeing a shift in funeral services where more and more families are wanting a unique celebration to honor their loved ones," Tarmann said. "The Viking-Packer rivalry was significant to Don, so what a perfect way for family and friends to honor his life. Just the way Don would have wanted it."
Posted by Jill Fallon at 12:26 PM | Permalink

Jean-Paul Sartre at the end of his life

Even Jean-Paul Sartre seems to have glimpsed that, for as death approached he began to speak of some sort of Messianic Judaism.  Later his mistress, Simone de Beauvoir, acidly called it “this senile act of a turncoat.”  In a testimony recorded by his friend and former Marxist, Pierre Victor,  Sartre said: “I do not feel that I am the product of chance, a speck of dust in the universe, but someone who was expected, prepared, prefigured.  In short, a being whom only a Creator could put here; and this idea of a creating hand refers to God.”
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It would be difficult to think of anyone more unlike Sartre than his contemporary political philosopher Charles Maurras who recovered his Catholic faith only late in life.  In Sartre’s better moments, in the Second World War, he resisted the barbarism with which Maurras cooperated.  But each had his last Advent.  Sartre’s last words were, “I have failed.”  As for Maurras, who had become deaf as a teenager, he said to the doctor at his bedside:  “At last I can hear someone coming.”

Fr. George Rutler on The Awkwardness of Advent

Posted by Jill Fallon at 11:18 AM | Permalink