January 12, 2017

Skull smuggling, bunny tombstone, 'vampire' burials and funeral pole dancers

Mexican Cartels Using Artisanal Skulls for Smuggling into UK

Thousands of art pieces are shipped out of Mexico each year to buyers worldwide who seek their unique designs and colors. This art niche is now being used by Mexican cartels to hide drug packages in quartz and ceramic skulls or other sculptures to avoid customs inspections.  This art niche is now being used by Mexican cartels to hide drug packages in quartz and ceramic skulls or other sculptures to avoid customs inspections.

 Drugs-In-Skull-Testing-1

Found: The Tiny, Century-Old Headstone of a Pet Bunny

 Bunny Tombstone

Out walking in the woods in Sussex, England, Sid Saunders came across a headstone for a pet rabbit...

He said: “It says on there ‘In memory of the little Duchie’,  Sid says he wants to do some research in a bid to find out more about the family who left this tiny headstone behind.returned to the site recently to once again clean up the tiny headstone. “It’s something for this 73-year-old man to keep his brain active.”

'Vampire' Burials Uncovered in Poland

The skeletons have holes in the spine, most likely from someone nailing the bodies into the ground.
 Hole In Spine Vampire Burial
Polish archaeologists have uncovered the medieval remains of three "vampires" — individuals whose bodies were mutilated before interment to physically prevent any attempts to rise from the grave.  Dating to the 13th and 14th centuries, the deviant burials were unearthed in the village Górzyca in western Poland near a former bishop's residence. A Gothic cathedral once stood somewhere near the graves,

50 pole dancers escort Taiwan politician's funeral procession

These aren't your grandfather's pall bearers.  In the funeral procession of former Chiayi City county council speaker Tung Hsiang in Chiayi City, southern Taiwan were 50 pole dancers standing atop multicolored Jeeps.  Tung's son said his father appeared in a dream and told him he wanted his memorial to be "hilarious" and so it was according to one spectator.

 Taiwan-Funeral-Dancers
Earlier this year on the China Policy Institute website, anthropologist Marc Moskowitz, a professor at the University of South Carolina, wrote, "The stripping performances started out as something that gangsters did, but generally spread out to become common practice throughout Taiwan. They are primarily associated with the working class or poorer communities."  It's now illegal to have full nudity at funerals, according to Moskowitz.
Posted by Jill Fallon at January 12, 2017 3:44 PM | Permalink