May 6, 2017

Hitler's British death island

Astonishing story of how the Nazis murdered 40,000 people in Channel Island concentration camps - and planned to blitz the South Coast with chemical weapons
Unspeakable atrocities — which we will spell out in detail later — took place here. Not in distant territories on the other side of Europe, but just 60 miles from the coast of England, on an island that is British through and through and has owed its allegiance to the Crown since 1066.

 Channel Islands

That tiny Alderney — less than four miles long and a mile-and-a-half wide — was the site of slave labour camps during the war has been recognised for decades. But the scale of the operation and the number of deaths there have always been played down. After years of research, we are now in a position to reveal the grimmest truths.

The numbers who died there in helping Hitler and his henchmen pursue their evil master-plan were not the few hundreds spoken of in semi-official sources and history books. In fact, tens of thousands lost their lives in the most brutal way — at least 40,000 by our calculations and possibly many, many more. Such a toll makes Alderney nothing less than the biggest crime scene in British history.

The project on which they were engaged was not just the massive defensive works — the fortifications, bunkers, block-houses and anti-tank walls built all over the island on Hitler’s express orders to forestall an Allied invasion. There was a deadly offensive capability, too, never previously known. We have uncovered incontrovertible evidence that a top-secret launcher site for V1 missiles — one of Hitler’s vengeance weapons — was being constructed on the island. And the reason for that secrecy was that, shockingly, they were to be armed not with conventional explosives, but with internationally outlawed chemical warheads, capable of causing the same degree of destruction, terror and panic seen recently by President Assad’s chemical strike in Syria.
They are likely to have contained the very same nerve gas: Sarin.
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The target of these deadly doodlebugs? The southern coast of England from Weymouth to Plymouth, where in the winter of 1943 and spring of 1944 hundreds of thousands of British and American troops were assembling and preparing for the D-Day invasion.

If the Alderney missiles had been fired — and our conclusion is that they were within a whisker of this happening — their chemical payloads would have thrown Allied invasion plans into such chaos that D-Day could not have taken place on June 6, 1944, and the whole course of World War II would have been drastically altered.  The Allies would have been on the back foot and Hitler in the ascendancy. He might even have fulfilled his ambition to conquer Britain.
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When the Channel Islands were liberated in 1945, there was a mood and a move to minimise the events of the past five years when a slice of British territory had to exist under the Nazi heel.

It was embarrassing for the British government of the day, which had made a conscious decision in 1940 not to fight for the islands, but leave the residents to their fate.  It was embarrassing, too, for islanders and officials on Jersey and Guernsey who came to terms with the invaders in ways that sometimes bordered on collaboration and even treason. Uncomfortable questions were not asked. Veils were pulled over the truth, with the result that the full story of what happened on Alderney has been hidden.
Posted by Jill Fallon at 2:22 PM | Permalink

Roundup of Dying wishes and burials

Dying Paralyzed Veteran Granted Final Wish of Seeing Horses

A seriously ill paralyzed Vietnam veteran in Texas had one final wish — to see his two best friends - Sugar and Ringo - horses that he has trained and raised for a long time. Roberto is one of the only disabled licensed horse trainers in Texas. He had been in Vietnam for just a few months before being shot and injured on May 21, 1970, which left him paralyzed. He recently went to the hospital for a wound on his back, which is when it was discovered he also needed treatment for liver problems and that his kidneys were starting to shut down.

 Vietnam Vet Horse

“Horses are his life,” Rosario Gonzales told reporters of her husband, Roberto. “We’ve been training and raising horses for 30, 40 years.”  ...“When the horses came up to him, he actually opened his eyes,” Rosario said. “They came up to him and I think they were actually kissing him.”

A Tesco worker who died without any family is to have his ashes scattered – in the supermarket car park.

Much-loved Andy Hughes manned checkouts at the Stroud branch of Tesco ever since it opened 27 years ago. His sudden death aged 55 from respiratory failure on March 26 left colleagues in shock. But now they have discovered that Andy – who had learning difficulties – faces a simple, council funeral this Friday as his next of kin could not be located. The store’s personnel manager, Helen Skinner, said: “Andy was one of our original members and we all had an emotional attachment to him – we were his family, really.  Helen said there was “nobody in the area that didn’t know him” and that he “had a heart of gold.”  Staff are hoping to set up a memorial bench and rose bush in a quiet corner of the car park, and eventually scatter his ashes there.

A suspicious white hearse north of Tombstone alerted Border Patrol agents who used a K9 dog to inspect the vehicle.

The K9 alerted agents about a suspicious odor coming from the hearse, authorities said. During a search of the vehicle, agents discovered that a casket was filled with over 67 pounds of pot worth $33,000 worth of pot. the 67 pounds of marijuana was hidden between several bags of manure in an attempt to disguise the smell.  A man, 28, a U.S. citizen, was arrested.

 Border-Pot-Casket

Archaeologists discover medieval villagers hacked up dead bodies to prevent them returning as ZOMBIES

Medieval villagers feared the dead could return from the grave by the devil. To prevent the dead from attacking, the corpses were beheaded and chopped up. Some even had their hearts gouged out before being set on fire before burial. Researchers found the evidence in a medieval village of Wharram Percy in Yorkshire.

Their Hearts Were in It: One Renaissance Couple's Final Gesture

Researchers have discovered a Renaissance man had his heart removed after he died and buried with his beloved wife. Toussaint de Perrien, who died on 30 August 1649 had his heart put in an urn and buried with his wife - who was laid to rest 125 miles away and 7 years later...The body of his wife, Louise de Quengo, had been opened after death and her heart removed, perhaps to rest with her husband (though it has not been found).  The heart-swap burials are believed to have allowed 'for couples to be reunited in death'.

The Suicide Note as Literary Genre

After the great confessional poet John Berryman leapt from the Washington Avenue Bridge onto the icy banks of the Mississippi River (he waved at a passing car first), his wife Kate found a crumpled note in the wastebasket, written on the back of an envelope. It read simply:
O my love Kate, you did all you could.

I’m unemployable & a nuisance.
Forget me, remarry, be happy.

Posted by Jill Fallon at 1:36 PM | Permalink